Language

Chinese

Escapism

Escapism

 

Nowadays, with technology on the rise, it’s becoming easier and easier for people to pause their everyday lives and live online. Because the virtual world is so accessible and easy to use it makes reality seem so mundane and exhausting. In this day and age, during your average school/work day, I would be massively surprised if you didn’t see every single person check their phones at least once for a mini escape from whatever they’re doing. This is due to the fact that people are becoming more and more addicted to their online presence rather than living in the moment.

Imagine you’ve just come home from a long, hard day at work. What’s the first thing you do? Say hello to the family, the dog etc. Fine. After that? You’d probably check your phone. See what your friends have been up to. Maybe check their snapchat stories or have a look at what they’ve recently posted on twitter. While it is amazing that technology allows us to keep so up to date with everything that goes on around us it simultaneously distances us from real human connection. There’s not much left to talk about if you already know the ins and outs of everyone’s lives through social media. But, with the world being a very scary place, what with North Korea launching missiles into the sea and President Trump being the most powerful man in the world it’s no wonder that we turn to the virtual world as a means of escape and a place of safety from the real world. However, like most things, living online has its downfalls too.

Other than social media another massive part of the virtual industry is online gaming. Loads of people are becoming majorly addicted to video games to the point where they’ll spend hours and hours trying to unlock a certain prize or trying to reach the next level. What’s most worrying is how isolating these games are. Many are tricked into thinking that they are being social as they are playing against or with other gamers from around the world. They falsely think that they are having human contact and think they have made friends with these people. When unfortunately, the truth is that they’re actually still strangers, separated by a screen. The chances that they’ll ever meet are slim because they have become so infatuated with the games that the amount of time they spend in the ‘real world’ is greatly reduced.

Many who are addicted to online gaming are distanced from loved ones and isolate themselves. It’s made worse by the fact that these addicts are exploited by the gaming industry as they’ve come up with ways to keep the consumer hooked on their product. In the past, people would usually buy one game upfront and that would be it. The whole game was theirs. However, now many games are released as ‘Free to Play’ games. Pretty self-explanatory, the game is free for the consumer and so many people will play the game for free, no problem. Sounds too good to be true? The companies are aware that the majority of their gamers will play for free. They make their money by relying on a very small proportion of people getting majorly addicted to their game and spending a ridiculous amount of money trying to unlock levels straight away or buy access to hidden areas of the game that only people who pay can play.

Although many enjoy the escape into virtual reality it seems that it may no longer be possible to hide behind a screen. China are developing a giant facial recognition system to identify the 1.3 billion people living here. It’s goal will be for people to integrate the technology into their daily lives, for example, paying for things using a machine that will scan your face instead of scanning a QR code or be able to board planes without needing a boarding pass. As well as it being used by the many, it’ll also be used by the police and government to help identify criminals and suspects. The aim is that the system will roughly have a 90% accuracy rate. While, this idea has many positives and could massively help reduce crime rates it’s a scary thought it’s potentially the road that will lead to a world with absolutely no privacy.

There is a fine line between escaping from reality every now and then and living completely online. I know I personally love to check social media, or play games on my phone more often than I should. Sometimes reality gets too much and it’s nice to escape, whether that be into a virtual reality fantasy game or a gripping book. But, sometimes the idea of escape is too overpowering and people get lost in it. Technology is advancing so quickly that we shouldn’t avoid virtual reality but we should embrace it as it’s already a part of our real lives. All in moderation though…

Nowadays, with technology on the rise, it’s becoming easier and easier for people to pause their everyday lives and live online. Because the virtual world is so accessible and easy to use it makes reality seem so mundane and exhausting. In this day and age, during your average school/work day, I would be massively surprised if you didn’t see every single person check their phones at least once for a mini escape from whatever they’re doing. This is due to the fact that people are becoming more and more addicted to their online presence rather than living in the moment.

Imagine you’ve just come home from a long, hard day at work. What’s the first thing you do? Say hello to the family, the dog etc. Fine. After that? You’d probably check your phone. See what your friends have been up to. Maybe check their snapchat stories or have a look at what they’ve recently posted on twitter. While it is amazing that technology allows us to keep so up to date with everything that goes on around us it simultaneously distances us from real human connection. There’s not much left to talk about if you already know the ins and outs of everyone’s lives through social media. But, with the world being a very scary place, what with North Korea launching missiles into the sea and President Trump being the most powerful man in the world it’s no wonder that we turn to the virtual world as a means of escape and a place of safety from the real world. However, like most things, living online has its downfalls too.

Other than social media another massive part of the virtual industry is online gaming. Loads of people are becoming majorly addicted to video games to the point where they’ll spend hours and hours trying to unlock a certain prize or trying to reach the next level. What’s most worrying is how isolating these games are. Many are tricked into thinking that they are being social as they are playing against or with other gamers from around the world. They falsely think that they are having human contact and think they have made friends with these people. When unfortunately, the truth is that they’re actually still strangers, separated by a screen. The chances that they’ll ever meet are slim because they have become so infatuated with the games that the amount of time they spend in the ‘real world’ is greatly reduced.

Many who are addicted to online gaming are distanced from loved ones and isolate themselves. It’s made worse by the fact that these addicts are exploited by the gaming industry as they’ve come up with ways to keep the consumer hooked on their product. In the past, people would usually buy one game upfront and that would be it. The whole game was theirs. However, now many games are released as ‘Free to Play’ games. Pretty self-explanatory, the game is free for the consumer and so many people will play the game for free, no problem. Sounds too good to be true? The companies are aware that the majority of their gamers will play for free. They make their money by relying on a very small proportion of people getting majorly addicted to their game and spending a ridiculous amount of money trying to unlock levels straight away or buy access to hidden areas of the game that only people who pay can play.

Although many enjoy the escape into virtual reality it seems that it may no longer be possible to hide behind a screen. China are developing a giant facial recognition system to identify the 1.3 billion people living here. It’s goal will be for people to integrate the technology into their daily lives, for example, paying for things using a machine that will scan your face instead of scanning a QR code or be able to board planes without needing a boarding pass. As well as it being used by the many, it’ll also be used by the police and government to help identify criminals and suspects. The aim is that the system will roughly have a 90% accuracy rate. While, this idea has many positives and could massively help reduce crime rates it’s a scary thought it’s potentially the road that will lead to a world with absolutely no privacy.

There is a fine line between escaping from reality every now and then and living completely online. I know I personally love to check social media, or play games on my phone more often than I should. Sometimes reality gets too much and it’s nice to escape, whether that be into a virtual reality fantasy game or a gripping book. But, sometimes the idea of escape is too overpowering and people get lost in it. Technology is advancing so quickly that we shouldn’t avoid virtual reality but we should embrace it as it’s already a part of our real lives. All in moderation though…

And... That's it!

 

The Supermarket Inside your Living Room

The Supermarket Inside your Living Room

J Apostrophe: Feminine Avant-Garde

J Apostrophe: Feminine Avant-Garde

0